It is my philosophy not to take from the community with out giving anything. That is why before asking any new question I will make sure to answer one question to the best of my knowledge so that it will be useful to at least the asker. I have answered the question "Name for “jack of all trades” type role". However it is attracting down-votes. The question also had down-votes. I have reviewed my answer and didn't find any reasons behind the down votes. Does answering a question with down votes attract down-votes?

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sometimes it's rather opposite, as discussed at MSO: Is “Don't do it” a valid answer? 'received dozens of "Don't Do It!!!!" responses, which then got upvoted...' –  gnat Mar 4 '13 at 5:47
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3 Answers 3

What you posted isn't an answer.

You posted a series of questions for the asker. If you don't have the ability to post an actual answer (which happens often with questions which are closed, given the criteria for close votes) post comments asking those clarifications beforehand.

Otherwise, you will pick up downvotes (and rightly so in my opinion).

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Understand your point. However along with the questions, I have posted answers also. Now If I remove my questions will it be considered as answer? –  Babu Mar 3 '13 at 14:22
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While it's great that you want to give back, sometimes it's important to understand that the goal of Stack Exchange is to help not just the asker, but to also help the thousands of future visitors who will visit that Q&A piece.

Remember, there is but one asker, but there are countless future visitors who may have the same or a similar problem.

With that said, even in its edited form, the answer still doesn't appear to be supported by facts, references, or specific expertise. What's more, these things are hard to include in questions that begin with assumptions regarding the incompleteness of the question.

The goal of Stack Exchange is to provide high quality answers to questions about a real, actual problem the asker is facing. The answers should clearly and definitively answer the question as per the guidelines in How to Answer.

While it is okay to list assumptions in your answer, please understand that the assumptions you list are actually required in order to give a solid answer, and as enderland mentions, this could be cleared up by posting clarifying comments to the asker.

Lastly, I want to address something you said in your question, something that I consider very important on Stack Exchange sites:

It is my philosophy not to take from the community with out giving anything. That is why before asking any new question I will make sure to answer one question to the best of my knowledge so that it will be useful to at least the asker.

Keep in mind that the people who ask great, well-researched questions that follow the guidelines in How to Ask and the FAQ are giving back to the community. Some may even argue that questions are much more important than answers, as a single question can set the stage for 5 or more outstanding answers. Without good questions, we don't have good answers.

When a person asks a well-researched question, he or she should be putting effort into making sure it's well written, that important details are included, and that he or she has done a basic search to gain a better understanding of the problem so that the answers will actually make sense to the asker.

We can lead a horse to water, but we can't make him drink. So when an asker puts in effort to meet the answerers half-way, this is where the real learning happens, and that learning extends to many others who perhaps aren't as articulate enough to ask such well-written questions.

If you ask questions in this manner, you rock! This site wouldn't exist without you! Don't ever think you aren't giving back by asking good questions! :)

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I just love this answer! You rock jmort253!! I second that with the point that questions and answers are two different skill sets - I seem to be a great answer-er, but have absolutely no pride about my ability to write questions. I like to think of it as specialization of labor, and I'm thankful for the people who can write that relevant question that we've all be asking all these years! :) –  bethlakshmi Mar 7 '13 at 13:52
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To point to the example - when a question is very vague, it's nearly impossible to answer - so the downvoted question leading to downvoted answers is in this case true. You're asking the question maker a bunch of counter questions - which is a discussion format that doesn't fit us. That's probably why the question is getting downvoted - it's too vague to answer. A better way to approach questions is to put them in comments on the question. –  bethlakshmi Mar 7 '13 at 13:55
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Does answering a question with down votes attract down-votes?

Hmm... Probably not.

But I would argue that a downvoted question tends to attract more downvotes because it perpetuates a "bandwagon effect" that works in concert with a "groupthink effect".

EDIT: Of course, as @enderland points out, the reverse often happens too.

"oh someone downvoted this? I like it kinda - here's a sympathy upvote!"

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This is a community driven site, where initially what is and isnt acceptable is pushed by the majority of the community, of course there will be the bandwagon effect! What is and isnt acceptable is driven by the bandwagon effect –  RWY Mar 4 '13 at 15:53
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The reverse often happens on answers. "oh someone downvoted this? I like it kinda - here's a sympathy upvote!" –  enderland Mar 4 '13 at 18:10
    
@enderland: Indeed. That happens too. –  Jim G. Mar 4 '13 at 21:52
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